Career Coaching

How to Make the Most of Self-Isolation  

by Jody Bruner

Like most of you practicing self-isolation and social distancing, I’m getting lonely and stressed out. I miss seeing my family and friends and getting out to yoga classes. Most of the media is alarming, and it looks like self-isolation, or cocooning, is the new normal for a while.   

About 12 years ago, I had a slow summer. I remember reading a blog by Seth Godin, written to students with a summer off and no job. He gave great advice: use this time to take on a project and accomplish something you can add to your resume. Train for a marathon, learn a new language, learn to code. I was inspired and decided to build a website. It was a great way to turn what could have been stressful and boring (a quiet summer) into something satisfying, even fun!  

The Globe and Mail recently published How to Survive the Cocoon of Self-Isolation, and it reminded me of the Seth Godin blog. As many of us begin to work from home, have less to do as work slows down, and miss our normal routines, we need to find new structure and inspiring projectsIt’s a great time to sharpen your saw, so when things rebound, you’ll have an advantage. Here are some ideas to help you survive, even thrive, while we cocoon: 

  • Maintain a sense of routine. Get out of bed and get dressed every day. Create a workspace and stick to a schedule. 
  • Limit the amount of time you spend googling Coronavirus. Being informed is great, but obsessing isn’t going to help. 
  • Meet up with your people virtually. Have a beer or cup of tea together on a video call. We are lucky to have technology that keeps us connected. 
  • Feeling stressed? Learn how to practice mindfulness. Find online yoga classes, journal, or download a meditation app like Headspace. 
  • Use your new-found time productively. Gain a new skill. Maybe you can learn to speak a new language so when travel becomes an option again, you’ll have an edge. Learn how to play chess or bridge. Finish that knitting project. 
  • Train yourself and your team. If you run a business or manage a team, it’s a great time to sharpen your saw. If you’ve been thinking about improving your team’s communication skills, let us help virtually. 
  • Get ready for the rebound. It will come! In the meantime, update your website, your boilerplate letters and your canned presentations. Need help? We can teach you how or do it for you. 

Personally, I’m going to learn how to play chess. What about you? 

New Role, New You? 5 Tips to Change Your Image

career management crossroadsby Brittany Moor

In a Building Your Own Brand workshop I recently facilitated, a participant told me she wanted to apply for a new role in her organization. She is currently an administrator and now wants to move into project management or marketing. She applied for roles outside her department before and was unsuccessful. She worried that the hiring managers and decision-makers only see her as an administrator, and she asked what she can do to change their perception of her. Read more

Do You Get It?

business writing by Brittany Moor

I was recently talking to a new client about writing skills training for their team. Her organization had run similar training before, and she told me it could have included more detail. So of course, I asked her to tell me more! She said she was looking for a more targeted approach this time. So, I asked again: “Tell me more. What does a targeted approach look like to you?”  Read more

How Can Millennials Get Ready to Lead?

leadershipby Brittany Moor

Dear fellow millennials: are you ready to lead? Read more

Technical Writing: Infographic

Click here for a downloadable PDF

Should You be Branding Yourself?

branding yourselfby Leigh Geraghty

Most of us understand the benefits of branding our business-it helps build recognition, credibility, customer loyalty and a competitive edge. But what about branding yourself? What is personal branding, and why is it an increasingly important area of employee development?

Personal branding is how you define and portray yourself as a person and a business professional. Your brand expresses your interests, talents, personality, and expertise. It portrays the person you are and the person you want others to see. You want to make sure that you are using a custom SEO for your brand to hone in on the target customers that you ideally need for your business, for example, if your brand was of luxury items like furniture, then you would look into seo for luxury brands and how it can help you. Read more

How to Create Your Own Email Protocol

email protocolby Rachel Eidan

Are your team’s email practices inconsistent, causing confusion and miscommunication? This is an issue we hear about often from our clients. Although we teach teams to write effective emails, improve etiquette, and communicate strategically, some groups still need help with fundamental conventions. If this sounds like your team, try creating your own company email protocol. Here’s a quick how-to: Read more

Listening Skills for Effective Communication

listening skillsby Rachel Eidan

We can all be more effective communicators by using our ears more than our mouths. Be honest, how much have you ever learned listening to yourself talk?

We often think that good communicators are good speakers; however, the most powerful communicators have excellent listening skills. Of course, there are some tips of effective communication that extend beyond simply listening, although this element is absolutely crucial. Many people take the skill of listening for granted. You have ears, so you listen all the time, right? But you need to ask yourself how well you listen. Read more

Communicating Out: Technical to Non-Technical

 

 

Jody Bruner from Wavelength and David Donaldson from TidalShift, experts in project management, team up to discuss one of our most asked about topics: communicating to non-technical people.

 

Transcription: Read more

3 Tips for Writing an Effective Performance Review

performance review

by Alan De Back

The end of the calendar year is when many organizations start their performance review process. Both employees and managers often find the process confusing, frustrating, and demotivating. Whether employees are writing their self-review or managers are writing their supervisory reviews, many struggle with what to write and how to write it. If they’re not careful, managers can lose the opportunity to not only improve their team members’ performance but also improve their relationships and communication channels.

Here are three tips to help you in the performance review process:

Always provide specific examples. 

Simply writing “I am a great employee” or “Tom did a great job” is not enough.  You need to give specific examples Read more